Airlines

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USA: DOT reminds airlines on their obligations regarding damaged baggage

Following a routine airport inspection at 16 airports nationwide in a two week period in September 2015, the U.S. Department of Transportation issued a notice reminding airlines that they are required to compensate passengers for damage to wheels, straps, zippers, handles, and other protruding parts of checked baggage beyond normal wear and tear.  The notice also reminds airlines of their obligation to accept all reports of mishandled baggage from consumers even if an airline’s agent believes the airline is not liable.

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Air carriers to stack passengers in aircrafts?

According to a report published on telegraph.co.uk, aircraft manufacturer Airbus has designed a mezzanine level for planes which would stack passengers above others. However, it is questionable, that the invention will ever make it past the design stage. To read the article which also contains sketches of the mezzanine level seating, see http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/11914067/Airbus-designs-mezzanine-to-seat-plane-passengers-on-top-of-each-other.html

 

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Thailand: new International Carriage by Air Act

Thailand which is not a party of the Montreal Convention yet has adopted a new  International Carriage by Air Act to come into force on May 14, 2015. The Act will apply to domestic and international carriage by air and will replace the application of the Thai Civil and Commercial Code to aviation cargo and passenger claims. It intends to approximate national law to the Montreal Convention of 1999 inter alia by introducing liability limits and a two years limitation period. An English translation of the Thai International Carriage by Air Act B.E.

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IFTTA Law Review 1-2015 available online

The IFTTA Law Review 1-2015 has been uploaded to the members' area of the IFTTA website. It contains articles on the European Passenger Rights Regulations (Tobias Eberharter), the Israeli experience with the cancellation of airline commissions to travel agents (Dov Kolani) and the issue of forseeable hazards in the toursim legislative framework (Jacqueline Tanti Dougall). Enjoy reading.

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Germany: two new Supreme Court decisions on air passenger rights

On March 17, 2015 the German Supreme Court (BGH) has passed two judgements with regard to Regulation (EC) 216/2004.

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CJEU: computerised booking systems must, from the outset, indicate the final price of each flight ticket

The German Federal Union of Consumer Organisations and Associations was challenging before the German courts the way in which air fares were presented in Air Berlin’s computerised booking system, as configured in November 2008: Once the date and airports of departure and arrival had been selected, the booking system displayed a table of possible connections. The final price per person, however, was indicated only for the connection pre-selected by Air Berlin or clicked on by the customer, and not for every connection shown.

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German Supreme Court regards Lufthansa's frequent flyer terms and conditions lawful

The Plaintiff was a participant of Lufthansa's frequent flyer programme ("Miles & More") terms and conditions of which state that  air tickets aquired under the programme must not be transferred to any third persons unless this person had a tight personal relationship to the participant. Nevertheless, the plaintiff booked air tickets on behalf of a third person who he had no personal relation to using his bonus "miles". Lufthansa therefore terminated plaintiff's participation in the programme and cancelled his HON Circle Member status.

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Canada: denied boarding claim dismissed by Ontario Superior Court of Justice

The plaintiff booked a seven-day trip to Jamaica with WestJet. On September 18, 2011he was given a boarding pass for the outward flight when he presented his Canadian citizenship card at the airport. After a week in Jamica, he presented himself for boarding for the return flight but was denied baording because  he did not have a passport but only presented his Canadian driver's licence, health card and social insurance card. The plaintiff  protested, arguing that the citizenship card had been sufficient for him to travel to Jamaica.

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CJEU: passport cancelled - visa lives on

On 8 October 2010, an Indian citizen travelled from Moscow to Riga with Air Baltic. At the border control at Riga airport, he presented a valid Indian passport without a visa and a cancelled Indian passport to which a valid uniform visa issued by Italy was affixed. The Indian citizen was refused entry into Latvia on the ground that he did not have a valid visa. Moreover, the Latvian authorities imposed a fine of LVL 2 000 (approximately €2 850) on Air Baltic for transporting to Latvia a person without the travel documents necessary to cross the border.

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