Cases

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

Canada: denied boarding claim dismissed by Ontario Superior Court of Justice

The plaintiff booked a seven-day trip to Jamaica with WestJet. On September 18, 2011he was given a boarding pass for the outward flight when he presented his Canadian citizenship card at the airport. After a week in Jamica, he presented himself for boarding for the return flight but was denied baording because  he did not have a passport but only presented his Canadian driver's licence, health card and social insurance card. The plaintiff  protested, arguing that the citizenship card had been sufficient for him to travel to Jamaica.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

CJEU: passport cancelled - visa lives on

On 8 October 2010, an Indian citizen travelled from Moscow to Riga with Air Baltic. At the border control at Riga airport, he presented a valid Indian passport without a visa and a cancelled Indian passport to which a valid uniform visa issued by Italy was affixed. The Indian citizen was refused entry into Latvia on the ground that he did not have a valid visa. Moreover, the Latvian authorities imposed a fine of LVL 2 000 (approximately €2 850) on Air Baltic for transporting to Latvia a person without the travel documents necessary to cross the border.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

CJEU provides another clarification of the Air Passenger Rights Regulation (EC) 216/2004

In its judgement of today, the Court of the European Union (CJEU) held that the ‘arrival time’, which is used to determine the length of the delay to which passengers on a flight have been subject, corresponds to the time at which at least one of the doors of the aircraft is opened, the assumption being that, at that moment, the passengers are permitted to leave the aircraft.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

USA: court finds 'No Fly List' unconstitutional

A federal judge in Orgeon struck down as unconstitutional the government’s procedures for people on the No Fly List to challenge their inclusion.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

German Supreme Court: general strike or breakdown of the radar system qualify as "extraordinary circumstances"

The German Supreme Court (BGH) recently decided two cases related to flight delays.

In the first case, the plaintiff's flight from Frankfurt/Main to Menorca was delayed more than 3 hrs because of a general strike in Greece which affected the previous circulation of the aircraft. The return flight to Frankfurt was also delayed more than 3 hrs because of a breakdown of the radar system in the Greek airspace which, again, delayed the arrival of the aircraft from a previous circulation.

Lewis Solomon's picture

High Court ruling in Huzar v Jet2.com Limited is a ‘blow’ for the industry

The UK travel industry will be bracing itself for potentially the largest financial threat of all time, following the High Court ruling today in the case of Ron Huzar Vs Jet2.com Limited. The airline Jet2, has lost its appeal against a County Court Ruling, which held it was liable to pay compensation to a passenger, Mr Ron Huzar and fellow passengers were subjected to a 27-hour delay on a flight from Manchester to Malaga on 26 October 2011.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

More references for CJEU prelimiary ruling on Air Passenger Rights Regulation lodged by German courts

With regard to Reg. EC No 261/2004 (" Air Passenger Rights Regulation") the follwowing issues have recently been referred to the CJEU by German courts:

1. Reference of Feb. 4, 2014 by Landgericht Hannover  (C-79/14 - TUIfly):

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

German Court: air carrier liable for allergic reaction to hot towel

In a recent judgement the Oberlandesgericht Frankfurt am Main held that an air carrier was liable for a passenger's allergic reaction to the hot towels distributed during the flight. In October 2010, the plaintiff traveled on a fligth from India to Germany. She told one of the flight attendants that the hot towels could cause an allergic reaction of her body and asked not to distribute these towels during the flight. Despite this request, the towels were distributed and the plaintiff suffered from a respiatory distress which required immediate medical treatment after landing.

Michael Wukoschitz's picture

U.S. Supreme Court: Frequent flier claim preempted by Airline Deregulation Act

Northwest terminated Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg’s membership in its frequent flyer program, apparently based on a provision in the fre­quent flyer agreement that gave Northwest sole discretion to deter­mine whether a participant had abused the program. Rabbi Ginsberg filed a suit, asserting, that Northwest had breached its contract by revoking his membership status without valid cause and had violated the duty of good faith and fair dealing because it terminated his membership in a way that contravened his reasonable expectations.

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